Learn by listening and by doing

Learn by listening and by doing

With my spring semester in the rearview mirror, and the fall semester up ahead, I’m trying to take advantage of this time of year — the summer months — to catch up on and even get ahead on my work with a few things at Gloria Green Entertainment.

I don’t keep my company going each year because I have nothing better to do when I’m not in the classroom. I keep Gloria Green Entertainment going because there’s nothing I like better than continuing to work in the entertainment industry. I think remaining engaged with what’s going on in the music industry makes me a better Professor of Music Business in Academia. And continuing to work directly with clients at my company helps to make me a better entertainment executive on behalf of those clients. 

I don’t think anyone can ever reach a point in their life, in any field of study or career, where there’s not room to learn more.  And in this every changing entertainment environment, with new laws, new players in the biz, and new technology, there’s always opportunities to learn how to do something better, more efficiently, more financially beneficial, and more successful for you, your client; and in my case, even my students.

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 That’s why I’ve spent a week in May for the past four years at the Music Biz conference in Nashville. It’s a chance for me to add to my educational repertoire, gathering new information about how the general public consumes, purchases, shares, and engage with entertainment. And also hear about the latest technology impacting how the industry creates, distributes, markets, and promotes artists. As an Educator, it’s also an opportunity for me and my colleagues to share with the industry what we’re doing from a teaching prospective. Which is why I’ve made it a point to try to not just attend, but speak at this conference for the past few years, and hope to continue being involved.

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Music Business education and the Music Business industry have to work in partnership with each other to survive. It’s like I often tell people who work in the industry and ask me what I do. I tell them “I teach your future employees.” That is a true statement that not many people think about. It’s easy to just think that college is for learning, and the job is for doing. But if employers want good employees who have some idea about what they’re doing; know something already about the industry; and maybe specifically know about their company — then it makes the transition smoother for that graduate to become the employee they can’t do without.

So the industry needs to have a vested interest in what’s going on in the various music business programs at universities around the country. And music business educators must be willing to invest time in continuing education by attending industry conferences, watching webinars, reading trade publications, and seeking other opportunities to stay connected.

Learning by listening and learning by doing are equally important in my book! And doing both is something that I owe to my clients, my students, and myself.

 

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